Last edited by Tojora
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of Staffordshire dialect words found in the catalog.

Staffordshire dialect words

Wilson, David

Staffordshire dialect words

a historical survey

by Wilson, David

  • 114 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Moorland Publishing Co. in Buxton .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Staffordshire (England),
  • England,
  • Staffordshire
    • Subjects:
    • English language -- Dialects -- England -- Staffordshire -- Glossaries, vocabularies, etc.,
    • Staffordshire (England) -- Languages -- Dictionaries.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 67.

      Statement[by] D. Wilson.
      GenreDictionaries.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPE2042 .W5
      The Physical Object
      Pagination67 p. :
      Number of Pages67
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5248762M
      ISBN 100903485222
      LC Control Number75321084

      British Slang is a fountain of beautiful words that we don’t normally use in America. Some are hilarious, some are rude and some are interesting. Here’s our list of our top favorite British slang words and phrases. Oftentimes, it’s not so much the word itself that’s awesome – but the usage of it so [ ]. As such bostin is a rare dialect word, for most of our old words and sayings can be found elsewhere in what was once the Anglo-Saxon region of West Mercia, which included what is now South Lancashire, Cheshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire, Shropshire, Herefordshire and Gloucestershire.

      High quality Yorkshire Dialect inspired greeting cards by independent artists and designers from around the world. Unique artwork for posting words of wisdom or decorating your wall, fridge or office. All orders are custom made and most ship worldwide within 24 hours. Buy Ey Up Mi Duck!: Dialect of Derbyshire and the East Midlands (Local Dialect) 1st Paperback Edition by Scollins, Richard, Titford, John (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(44).

        Robinson says that between and , the Oxford professor of comparative philology, Joseph Wright, edited a six-volume English Dialect Dictionary, initially at Author: Stuart Jeffries.   Things Only Stokies Understand Having being born and lived in Stoke for 20 years, you learn that your home city is a little bit different from others. We Stokies have an abundance of bizarre phrases and words thanks to the Potteries Dialect and there are some things people just don’t get unless they’re a Stokie.


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Staffordshire dialect words by Wilson, David Download PDF EPUB FB2

North Staffordshire Dialect - Words and Phrases [A-C] a: a many people, a many times, a many years; "a" superfluous: abear "can't abear him" = don't like him: afeared: afraid: afore: before: aint: is not: aks: ask: all along of you: it's all through you, you are the cause of it.

Staffordshire's local Words, Phrases and Sayings - suggested by you. Whether dialect words or the way we say it, we've been hearing from you about the way we speak.

Genre/Form: Dictionaries Glossaries, vocabularies, etc: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Wilson, David, Staffordshire dialect words. You can share this quiz with your friends and test their knowledge of the local dialect too.

Have a go at our quiz below and see how many you get right - good luck. Question - 1 of 13 Score - 0 of 0. reading made easy; a very simple reading book - early 19th century. Rinkers: large marbles for games: Rimson: to clean out; to tidy: Roche: rock that is crumbling, disintegrating (from the French) Rodney: labourer on a barge; a fellows that's no good: Rondled: rope that is over wound by the colliery winder: Round.

The history of the Potteries dialect Steve Birks, a Potter himself, and chronicler of the Stoke on Trent area, tells us about the origins of the local dialect of North Staffordshire. The first documented instance of Potteries dialect is by the prominent Staffordshire lawyer John Ward (–) and local historian Simeon Shaw [8] in their book The Borough of Stoke-upon-Trent published inin which Ward recorded phonetically a conversation which he overheard in Burslem marketplace in East Midlands English is a traditional dialect with modern local and social variations spoken in those parts of the Midlands loosely lying east of Watling Street separating it from West Midlands English, north of a variable isogloss of the variant of Southern English of Oxfordshire and East Anglian English of Cambridgeshire and south of another that separates it from the Yorkshire.

The Writings In Prose and Rhyme In North Staffordshire Dialect by the Potteries Poet This is a digital edition of a book of poems that William Steele wrote, describing his life in the Potteries at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries.

General Interest. Lowlands-L a discussion group for people who are interested in Lowlands languages and cultures.

(Includes English and Scots) A Celebration of English Dialect in England A UK website which purports to "encourage the use of traditional English Dialects which have been threatened almost to extinction by the dominance of Standard English in the media.".

Full text of "Shropshire word-book, a glossary of archaic and provincial words, etc., used in the county;" See other formats.

: potteries dialect. Skip to main content. Try Prime Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account & Lists Orders Try Prime Basket. All. Converse with North Staffordshire folk with complete confidence. Everything you need to survive in The Potteries covering basic grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation rules.

A fast track course for beginners - makes learning Potteries dialect easy and fun. Easy-to-find phrases for every social situation. As with most local dialects in English, Potteries dialect derives originally from Anglo Saxon Old English.

The 14th-century Anglo Saxon poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, which appears in the Cotton Nero A.x manuscript uses dialect words native to the Potteries, leading some scholars to believe that it was written by a monk from Dieulacres Abbey.[1].

Cheshire dialect contains some words that are distinct from standard English, such as "shippen" for cattle-house. [7] According to Leigh, most unique Cheshire words derive from Anglo-Saxon; "shippen" is from scypen.

[1] [7] Other words derive from transposition, for example, "waps" for "wasp" and "neam" for "name". [1]. Derbyshire Dialect Paperback – January 1, by Mike Smith (Author) out of 5 stars 7 ratingsReviews: 7.

Origin and history. As with most local dialects in English, Potteries dialect derives originally from Anglo Saxon Old 14th-century Anglo Saxon poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, which appears in the Cotton Nero A.x manuscript uses dialect words native to the Potteries, leading some scholars to believe that it was written by a monk from Dieulacres Abbey.

Derbyshire folk may not have as recognisable an accent as the Welsh, Scousers, Brummies, Scots or Geordies, but there are plenty of words and phrases that are our very own.

Our local dialect is Author: Chris Mallett. Lancashire dialect is often used in folk songs that originate from the area.

The folk song "Poverty Knock" is one of the best-known songs, describing life in a Lancashire cotton mill. The Houghton Weavers is a band, formed inthat continues to sing in Lancashire dialect. The Richness by Steve Driscoll £ Steve Driscoll’s debut book, The Richness, is the result of decades worth of ll first aspired to write a novel at the age of Since then, he has pursued a career in social work, and having finally envisioned the concept for his novel about 10 years ago, he thus set to work on his new venture.

The Disappearing Dictionary: A Treasury of Lost English Dialect Words - Kindle edition by Crystal, David. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Disappearing Dictionary: A Treasury of Lost English Dialect by: 2.

The Lancashire dialect and accent (Lanky) refers to the Northern English vernacular speech of the English county of Elmes' book Talking for Britain said that Lancashire dialect is now much less common than it once was, but it is not quite extinct, still spoken by the older population.

The British Census has never recorded regional dialects.Wer, short sound of were; used in dialect for was, and occasionally for our We s’, we shall Weyvin’, weaving Wheer, where Whol, while Wi’, with Wi’nod, will not Wi’ ‘t, with it Wo, wall Wod, (1) what, (2) would Wodn’d, would not Wooave, wove Wo’st, worst Wo’th, worth.

Yar, our Yed, head Yer, Yore, your Yo’n, you have.